Chicago Open Trash Tournament

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In many recent years, the Sunday following the Chicago Open has featured a trash tournament.

The Tournaments

Year Tournament name Writers/editors Winning team Stats
2005 Mordechai Richler Trash Tournament Andrew Yaphe Ezequiel Berdichevsky, Matt Lafer, Paul Litvak, and Matt Weiner n/a
2006 Gottfried Keller Open Andrew Yaphe and Ezequiel Berdichevsky Greg Sorenson, Brian Hight, Jeremy White, and Mike Burger Stats
2008 Erik Axel Karlfeldt Memorial Open Andrew Yaphe (head editor), David Seal and Michael Arnold Greg Sorenson, Brian Hight, Colby Burnett, and Jeremy White n/a
2009 Ferdinand Tonnies Memorial Trash Tournament Andrew Yaphe (head editor), David Seal, Michael Arnold, and Mike Sorice Greg Sorenson, Brian Hight, Colby Burnett, and Jeremy White n/a
2010 Paul Goodman Memorial Open Michael Arnold with help from Susan Ferrari, Auroni Gupta, Andrew Yaphe and Sam Medley Greg Sorenson, Brian Hight, Colby Burnett, and Jeremy White Stats
2011 COLT Mike Bentley Brian Hight, Colby Burnett, Jeremy White, and a mysterious individual identified only as "Jimmy?" Stats
2013 Seth Teitler Presents: An Intimate Engagement with Trash David Seal, Brian McNamara, Owen Cooper, and Nolan Esser Brian Hight, Colby Burnett, and Yogesh Raut Stats]
2016 Chicago Open Trash Rob Carson, Carsten Gehring, and Andrew Hart Mike Cheyne, Tejas Raje, Kenji Golimlim, and Chris Manners Stats
2018 Chicago Open Trash Rob Carson, Carsten Gehring, and Andrew Hart Mike Cheyne, Tejas Raje, Kenji Golimlim, and Sam Bailey Playoff Stats

Victories by Player

Number of Victories Players
One Win Ezequiel Berdichevsky, Matt Lafer, Paul Litvak, Matt Weiner, Mike Burger, Jimmy?, Yogesh Raut, Chris Manners, Sam Bailey
Two Wins Mike Cheyne, Tejas Raje, Kenji Golimlim
Three Wins n/a
Four Wins Greg Sorenson
Five Wins Jeremy White, Colby Burnett
Six Wins Brian Hight

Style

The Chicago Open Trash tournament has brought about the development of the term-of-art "Yaphe trash" after the name of the usual driving force. Though each iteration of the tournament has been slightly different because of the various collaborators, tournaments have reflected the core principles of Yaphe trash:

- Meta quizbowl. Much to the chagrin of the some of the TRASH people who show up to the tournaments, questions about quizbowl events and individuals join meta clues in regular tossups.

- Academic content. Yaphe trash contains a higher proportion of academic content in questions. This manifests itself occasionally as trash clues about academic subjects, academic clues about otherwise trashy subjects or just plain academic questions. Curiously, in 2008 this proved more controversial among academic players than among the so-called "TRASH people," who more or less shrugged it off.[1]

- High proportion of "other" questions outside the Big 3 of trash of Sports, Music and Film/TV. Literature questions are much better represented than in TRASH or other trash tournaments while other pet topics of editors frequently come up (fashion, for example). This also allows for multidisciplinary clues to be used in common-link questions, which are themselves well-represented in Yaphe trash. Some claim the "other" distribution stints video games or other fields, while some claim it means the Big 3 are relatively underrepresented.

Commentary

While Matt Weiner has referred to the first two events and the two Maryland trash tournaments head-edited by Mike Bentley as the only four good trash tournaments ever produced, others, such as Greg Sorenson, have alleged that the Chicago tournaments featured even more 1980s content than trash usually does, notably in music. The 2008 edition was met with somewhat more praise from the usual TRASH people.